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Trails Impacted by Fires
Rob Williams
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09/15/2020 - 5:04 pm
Member Since: 09/20/2009
Forum Posts: 1420
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I thought I would post a list of trails that as of today have been impacted by the current fires (Riverside, Beachie Creek and Lionshead). The trails impacted thus far are:

  • Alder Flat Trail - 574
  • Battle Ax Creek Trail - 3339
  • Clackamas River Trail - 715
  • Cripple Creek Trail - 703
  • Double Peaks Trail - 735
  • Dry Ridge Trail - 518
  • Fish Creek Mountain Trail - 541
  • Gibson Lake Trail - 708
  • Hawk Mountain Trail - 564A
  • Hillockburn Trail - 516
  • Horseshoe Saddle Trail - 712
  • Lodgepole Trail - 706
  • Memaloose Trail - 515
  • Mon-Olallie Lake Trail - 732
  • Monon Lake Trail - 729
  • Olallie Butte Trail -720
  • Olallie Lake Trail - 731
  • Potato Butte Trail - 719A
  • Pyramid Butte Trail - 727
  • Red Lake Trail - 719
  • Rho Ridge Trail - 564
  • Rimrock Trail - 704
  • Riverside Trail - 715
  • Ruddy Hill Trail - 714
  • Significant portions of the PCT - 2000
  • Timber Lake Trail - 733
  • Top Lake Trail - 725
  • Whetstone Mountain Trail - 546

Some other info:

  • As of yesterday morning, the cabins at Olallie Lake were still surviving
  • The fate of the cabin on Hawk Mountain is unknown
  • The fate of the Oak Grove Work Center buildings is unknown
  • The fate of the buildings in Ripplebrook, Three Lynx and the Timber Lake Job Corps is unknown.

The impact on these trails and buildings is unknown at this time.  It is my hope that much of these fires was more of a mosaic burn which burned off a lot of the ground brush and not crown fires or concentrated heat which would cause entire stands to die.  All we can do at this point is watch and wait.

PStrobel
Trail Friend
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09/18/2020 - 9:52 am
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Forum Posts: 18
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I saw a picture from Three Lynx. Some structures burnt down. Some are still standing.

Rob Williams
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09/18/2020 - 10:29 am
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PStrobel said
I saw a picture from Three Lynx. Some structures burnt down. Some are still standing.  

If you have a link to the picture please post it.  I've not been able to find anything definitive on the status of anything in Ripplebook, Timber Lake, Oak Grove or 3 Lynx

kirk
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Trail Maintenance
09/19/2020 - 9:41 am
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Perhaps the cabin at Hawk Mountain is still intact.  I read this in an update from the fire:

Lionshead Fire Update – Thursday, September 17, 2020 – 9:00 a.m. 

...  Crews secured Hawk Cabin.  ....

Rob Williams
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09/19/2020 - 11:38 am
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kirk said
Perhaps the cabin at Hawk Mountain is still intact.  I read this in an update from the fire:

Lionshead Fire Update – Thursday, September 17, 2020 – 9:00 a.m. 

...  Crews secured Hawk Cabin.  ....

  

That would be exceptionally good news if it is what it sounds like!

PStrobel
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09/28/2020 - 11:43 am
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I'm hearing that they're cleaning up several old forest roads to get access to remote areas. It would be nice if they make these permanent to allow for future access. It does sound like they're doing work on Abbott, so at minimum that one should be improved.

Rob Williams
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09/28/2020 - 12:25 pm
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PStrobel said
I'm hearing that they're cleaning up several old forest roads to get access to remote areas. It would be nice if they make these permanent to allow for future access. It does sound like they're doing work on Abbott, so at minimum that one should be improved.  

I heard in one of the nightly briefings that they had repaired the slide along the Abott road and I'm sure they are going to be making it a lot more passable since they are using it as a fire break.  There will be quite a few trees cut along there I'm sure.  From there, they were going to go down road 58 so it will get some more work as well (although it had been brushed not too long ago) and then headed south somewhere from there.

It will certainly be interesting to see what things look like out there whenever we can get access again.

Doug Firman
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10/05/2020 - 3:50 pm
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This was posted today on Lionshead Fire facebook page:
 
Resource Advisors (READs) worked with firefighters to wrap structures at Olallie Resort, Olallie Guard Station and Hawk Mountain Cabin, which all survived the fire.
Rob Williams
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10/05/2020 - 3:56 pm
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Doug Firman said

This was posted today on Lionshead Fire facebook page:
 
Resource Advisors (READs) worked with firefighters to wrap structures at Olallie Resort, Olallie Guard Station and Hawk Mountain Cabin, which all survived the fire.   

That is GREAT news!  Probably the best news I've heard about the fire thus far.

Rob Williams
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10/06/2020 - 4:23 pm
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Here is the BAER Soil Burn Severity map of the Riverside fire showing relative burn intensities.  As feared, Fish Creek got hit REALLY hard:

2020_10_05-20.56.19.813-CDT.jpeg 

Here is the summary of the report:

Riverside Fire Soil Burn Severity Data Finalized

 

SANDY, OR, October 5, 2020 – Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) specialists from the U.S. Forest Service finalized the Soil Burn Severity map for the 137,792-acre Riverside Fire. Soil burn severity is classified into 4 levels: unburned, low, moderate and high.

 

BAER soil scientists used the burned area reflectance classification satellite image product to prioritize places in the field to assess soil burn severity. These individuals sampled accessible sites to evaluate soil changes caused by the fire. In particular, they are collecting information on ground cover, ash color, soil depth and structure, intact roots, and water repellency in order to build a picture of soil burn severity.

 

The analysis showed the following distribution of severity:

 

Severity Acres Percentage
High 16,934 12%
Moderate 55,118 40%
Low 47,548 35%
Unburned 18,192 13%
         137,792 100%

 

BAER post-fire assessment teams use the soil burn severity data to identify if there are areas of concern where increased soil erosion, accelerated surface water run-off, and debris flows have the potential to impact human life and safety, property, and critical natural and cultural resources from rain events. This information helps the BAER team determine areas where potential emergency stabilization treatments may occur. 

The Soil Burn Severity map isn’t an erosion risk map, but generally, increases in the rates of erosion and run-off are expected from steep hillslopes with high and moderate soil burn severity. Areas located downstream from moderate and high soil burn severity, even within unburned areas, may experience increased rates of erosion, debris flows, and surface run-off due to cumulative effects.

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