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Crosscut Saw Sharpening
Robert Koscik
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Trail Maintenance
04/10/2012 - 9:16 am
Member Since: 09/20/2009
Forum Posts: 314
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I have been busy sharpening crosscut saws here in Portland and have written a couple of articles about it.  Please take a look!  If anyone in the area needs their saw sharpened, or would like to order a brand new one ready to cut then please keep me in mind.

Thanks!  And thanks to Donovan for getting me inspired to do all of this nonsense.

-Bob

http://greencascadia.blogspot......ening.html

Donovan
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04/11/2012 - 6:22 pm
Member Since: 09/20/2009
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Pretty cool Bob.

 

I wonder if you'll have everyone ready for Saw Certification.

 

You will like having a saw vise. It makes things more comfortable. When I was stuck at Clackamas Lake tending the rental I found filing outside kinda nice for seeing the points real good.

 

Never got a decent swage. Broke some tho.

 

D.

Donald Presley
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04/13/2012 - 12:15 am
Member Since: 09/20/2009
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The class for chainsaw/crosscut saw certification was full before "we" were invited! Eventough this would have been my 5th year volunteering, I wasn't notified until the week before the class was scheduled. Sorry to say the class got filled up before I could even apply, mostly by horse people who work on the PCT(Pacific Crest Trail). Nothing against people who ride horses, for I did so for a dozen years or so. So as far as I know there is only one person who can use a chainsaw or a crosscut saw in our district to clear trails. Man is he going to be busy.

As is the case, if you are not with a large group of volunteers with a banner or national cause, you get shuffled off to the side by the FS. How long do "we" who do the majority of the work on the trails in our district have to set back and watch those who do a miminal amount of work take all the credit. I just want to be given the same amount of respect as the other group of volunteers.  If the FS is planninig for a chainsaw/crosscut saw class in our distrist, wouldn't they make sure they invited all those who do the work in their district, and especially those who do the majority of the work. I guess I don't see the "bigger picture".

Don

kirk
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04/13/2012 - 6:38 am
Member Since: 10/13/2010
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How does the certification process work?  Do you only get certified for a year? What does certification allow you to do that you aren't allowed to without it?

Donald Presley
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04/13/2012 - 11:24 am
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You must be certified with the FS to use a chainsaw and or crosscut saw to clear trails. It is usually a one day class, but sometimes it gets split into a couple of days. Half of the class is indoors going over the use of PPE (personal protective equipment), situation awareness, and the mechanics or physical properties of the logs you are trying to cut. The other half of the class is outdoors cutting logs with your chainsaw  or crosscut saw using the knowledge you just learned or have being using for years. This year I am told, you have to also be First Aid and CPR certified to use a chainsaw/crosscut saw. In the past, you could use handtools without certification, but that may have changed too.

If you want to do more than just thowing off limbs or rocks as you hike a trail, you should become a registered volunteer with the FS which covers you with their insurance should you get hurt working on trails. It also allows them to keep track of the number of volunteer hours doing trail work in our district. There are other benefits for registered volunteers: an annual Northwest Forest Pass, after 20 hours volunteer work, I believe; the use of their handtools; sometimes  the more frequent volunteers even got paid for mileage when their budget has allowed it.

Hopefully there will be another scheduled chainsaw/crosscut class so those who missed the earlier one, or weren't able to signup because the class was already full, can be certified to clear trails in our district.

Don

Donovan
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04/13/2012 - 6:14 pm
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As is the case, if you are not with a large group of volunteers with a banner or national cause, you get shuffled off to the side by the FS. How long do "we" who do the majority of the work on the trails in our district have to set back and watch those who do a miminal amount of work take all the credit.

Loving the Clackamas District trails has always required much individual initiative and dedication. Agencies and staff come and go.

 

One needs to muster as much internal satisfaction and appreciation from within because little comes from the outside.

 

D.

Robert Koscik
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04/13/2012 - 9:32 pm
Member Since: 09/20/2009
Forum Posts: 314
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Often when a large bureaucracy is involved, the spirit of those on the ground gets lost in the shuffle.  An abrupt change in management left us trail guys in a lurch.  I put in a lot of hours, but I probably put in more on abandoned trails...but in either case, I have not heard from the Forest Service in Estacada since Jacquelyn left.  We are in limbo.  She was our voice and we were cut off abruptly.

If they want us to have first aid certification, and since we are working our asses off (for free, and paying for our own gas!), then they should pay for the training to satisfy their requirement.  And of course have saw certification available.

 I've always done trail work for my own satisfaction, and like others, to preserve our linear museums of a lost time, snaking through forests that have stayed the same.  

I guess we all want to be democratic in the process of determining our wild lands.  I think of the Forest Service full of Model Ts and fire lookouts, but we live in a different era.  It's strange because, except for the roads and logging, nothing has really changed in the woods themselves, more or less...but our society has changed a great deal.  I signed up to be official about it, but I often wonder if it makes any difference.  Does anyone read those "trail reports"?  Who cares anyway?  I think government should always be "society in action" and not ruled by kings, no matter what their form or title.  With humans, it's never quite clear.  

Thanks to the internet, Trailadvocates has a voice.  Sooner or later someone's gonna wonder what happened to those "trail guys" crazy enough to carry crosscuts around, dodging trash and bullets.  Either that or we just carry on with bizness.  

Donald Presley
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04/14/2012 - 6:18 pm
Member Since: 09/20/2009
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Thanks guys, I was just venting. You can't keep that stuff inside too long before it wrecks havoc on your body. I don't care about being padded on the back stuff, I just want them to let me know when I need to take the saw class to be certified. How hard can that be? Evidently it must be rocket science.

I guess I will just do what I like the best, grab a roll of flagging and my gensu saw and head up into the mountains and look for more of the abandoned trails we seem to have so many of in our district.

Don

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